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An Air Raid Precautions warden (ARP) and his dog survey devastation from a bombing raid in Poplar, east London.
An Air Raid Precautions warden (ARP) and his dog survey devastation from a bombing raid in Poplar, east London.
©Imperial War Museum D5950

The newfound ability to attack civil populations from the air made it apparent that all civilians could be affected by war. This enormously changed the way people lived and worked in Britain during the Second World War.

Related documents

Search using Home Front Rationing Civil Defence Employment

Further reading

  • Calder, A., The People's War: Britain 1939-45 (London: Cape, 1969)
  • Hammond, R.J., Food (London: HMSO, 1951-1962)
  • Mackay, R., The Test of War: Inside Britain 1939-45 (London: UCL Press, 1998)
  • Mackay, R., Half the Battle: Civilian Morale in Britain During the Second World War (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2002)
  • Marwick, A., Total War and Social Change (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1988)
  • O'Brien, T.H., Civil Defence (London: HMSO, 1955)
  • Rose, S., Which People's War?: National Identity and Citizenship in Wartime Britain 1939-1945 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003)
  • Zweiniger-Bargielowska, I., Austerity in Britain: Rationing, Controls, and Consumption, 1939-1955 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000)