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A visit from Her Ladyship

Description of film

The story continues from the previous clip. John Daniell is now in debt. He spent a lot of money fighting in Ireland but his patron was accused of treason so John would not have a friend to get him a good job to pay off his debts. In this section of the play John expresses his frustration with all those who have not helped him, including Lady Essex. Lady Essex had left a casket for safe keeping with the Daniells for three months and then asked for it back. When it was returned it was found that the casket had been opened and some letters taken. Lady Essex then interrogated the Daniells about the missing letters. Suspicion first falls on the servants.

Context

This is one of six clips that make up a play based on the story of the Daniell family in Tudor times. John Daniell was an ambitious gentleman from Cheshire. He had been a supporter of the powerful Earl of Essex, a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I. John hoped to gain power and wealth by serving a powerful patron like Essex. He moved to Hackney with his wife and children in 1600. However Essex fell from favour with Elizabeth in 1602. The Daniells suffered as a result. They had been asked to keep some letters for the Earl of Essex's wife and when Essex fell this put them in a difficult position. This play tells their story.

Interesting or important points about the film

It is quite interesting how the play starts to shape the characters in the drama. John Daniell complains about how he has been treated, but does not come across very well himself. They are all actors of course, so we cannot be sure exactly how all the various people behaved. The scenes in the play are based on genuine documents in the Hackney Archives collection.

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Further information
CategoryPre 20th Century
Sub categoryTudors
FilmA visit from Her Ladyship
SourceN/A
ProducerThe National Archives and Hackney Archives
Year2000
DateNot known
Length3:02