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Latin Palaeography

Lesson Four - Abbreviations

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The word curia, -e (f.) is usually abbreviated to cur.
cur[ia]

example
Suspension

The word rex, regis (m.) is usually abbreviated to reg.
Reg[is]

example
Suspension

The name Simo, -onis (m.) is abbreviated to Sim.
Sim[onis]

example
Suspension

The words filius, -ii (m.) and filia, -e (f.) are usually abbreviated to fil.
fil[io]

example
Suspension

The name Nicholaus, -i (m.) is usually abbreviated to Nichol.
Nichol’

example
Suspension

The word scilicet is abbreviated to scil.
Scil[icet]

example
Suspension

An abbreviation resembling a bubble at the beginning of a word usually indicates that the  letters con should be supplied.
 [con]cessit

example
Contraction

The word post is abbreviated to p with a bubble-like abbreviation mark above it.
p[ost]

example
P abbreviation

A bubble-like abbreviation mark at the end of a word indicates that the letters us should be supplied.
ip[s]i[us]

example
Suspension

The name Ricardus, -i (m.) is often abbreviated to Ric or by leaving out the letters ard.
Ric[ardo]

example
Suspension

The letters em or m can be left off the word idem, eadem, idem.
ead[em]

example
Suspension

A superscript letter i, when it appears above the letter q, indicates that the letters ui have been left out.
q[ui]et[um]

example
Contraction

The letters es are often omitted from ecclesia, -e (f.).
eccl[esi]e

example
Contraction

The place Westmonasterium, -i (n.) is commonly abbreviated to ‘Westm’.
Westm[onasterium]

example
Suspension

The past participle of the verb facio, facere, feci, factum (3) is often abbreviated by omitting the a and t.
f[a]c[t]o

example
Contraction

The word de can be abbreviated to d.
d[e]

example
Suspension