Archive experiences

Each summer, The National Archives’ on site education team at Kew, London, offer young people in schools and colleges the chance to take part in a unique project that explores some of the hidden stories in our documents. Students carry out research, with support from our education team and record experts and work creatively with artists, writers or film makers as well as other students.

It’s a great opportunity to work with original sources; it’s also a chance to learn new skills, increase your subject knowledge in history and find out more about the role of The National Archives and the records we hold. The topics and the project outcomes are wide ranging, they have included film making, script writing, story boarding, painting and drawing so far.

Places are free, but are usually limited to a set number and involve an application process. Watch this space to see what is coming up and find out about past projects.

Students involved in one of our projects

2017 marks the 500th anniversary of the beginning of the Protestant Reformation.

From 31 July to 4 August 2017, The National Archives ran an exciting new film project for 16-19 year olds with film-maker Nigel Kellaway.

In 2016, a group of students aged 16 to 19 joined us to create a stop-motion animation film telling the stories of those who experienced the Battle of the Somme.