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Northern Ireland

In 1969 two members of the Royal Green Jackets man a street barricade in Belfast during their first tour of duty in Northern Ireland.
In 1969 two members of the Royal Green Jackets man a street barricade in Belfast during their first tour of duty in Northern Ireland.
©Imperial War Museum TR32962

The partition of Ireland in 1921 and the subsequent Irish Civil War did not mean the end to clashes over Ulster. Despite losing the Irish Civil War, the Irish Republic Army (IRA) maintained that only a united Ireland free from British rule was acceptable.

Related documents

Search using Irish Republican Army (IRA) Sunningdale Agreement

Further reading

  • Coogan, T.P., The IRA. Revised & updated edition (London: HarperCollins, 2000)
  • Hart, P., "Operations abroad": the IRA in Britain, 1919-23 (English Historical Review, 115 (460), pp. 71-102, 2000)
  • Smith, M.L.R. & Neumann, P.R., Motorman's Long Journey : Changing the Strategic Setting in Northern Ireland (Contemporary British History, 19 (4), pp. 413-435, 2005)
  • Wood, I.S., The IRA's border campaign 1956-1962 (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1999)